boris hamilton

Lake Shore Street, Puttalam

View of the jetty from the lighthouse, Puttalam

The view of the jetty from atop Puttalam’s abandoned lighthouse.

Picturesque Lake Shore Street runs along Puttalam’s lagoon. It’s a long, narrow and quiet street, with very little traffic. It runs from near the main round-about in town all the way down one of Sri Lanka’s (only?) wind farms.

I went for a few strolls here during my stay, meeting some very friendly, talkative and opinionated locals. Despite many Sri Lankan’s being able to speak basic English, conversations rarely go beyond the ‘your name?’, 'what country?’ and 'what do you think about Sri Lanka?’ questions; the latter is practically rhetorical, asked by locals eager to hear some positive feedback on their country, may it be sincere or not. However, when off the tourist trail, Sri Lankan’s seem much more willing to speak about their government and the hardships they face on a daily basis. 

fish nets

Fishermen check their nets for holes before heading out for the evening.

Puttalam

The lagoon is saline or brackish depending on places. Locals don’t swim or wash in it, although it is used for fishing.

library

This was taken inside a small library right on the shore of the lagoon. There were a few English books, mostly by L. Ron Hubbard. Just what Sri Lanka needs: another religion.

Jungle gym by the lagoon - Puttalam

Fishermen row out, pictured through the frame of a jungle gym.

colours

There are a couple of Mosques along Lake Shore street. There is a large Muslim community in Puttalam, quite a few of whom came from Mannar during the war.

jetty

Looking west across the lagoon from Puttalam, one can see Kalpitiya, a 20km strip of beach land (actually 14 islands) that runs parallel to the coast. 

doors

These colourfully-painted doors along the lagoon’s shore are used as store rooms for fishing equipment.

On the banks of the lagoon, Puttalam

Two boys sit under the umbrage of trees and watch two fishermen cast their net in the lagoon. 

Jaffna

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The Sangupiddy Bridge on the new A32 which runs from Mannar to Jaffna.

Jaffna has, unfortunately, pretty much become synonymous with the Sri Lankan civil war which plagued the island for 26 years. There are many obvious links. For instance, Prabhakaran grew up in Valvettithurai, a town a few kilometers outside of Jaffna. It was also nearby that the LTTE ambushed a patrol of the Sri Lanka Army, killing 13, on 23 July 1983. This attack sparked ’Black July’; generally regarded as the start of the war between the Sri Lankan government and the LTTE. And perhaps most notably, it was occupied by the LTTE on two occasions during the war, for a total of 6 years.

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One of the many abandoned houses on Jaffna peninsula. 

Traveling through Jaffna peninsula one can’t but notice the numerous abandoned houses, some of them shelled and bullet-ridden, others overtaken by the vegetation and many simply left to slowly decay. Despite these regular reminders of the war, Jaffna’s rich cultural heritage and diversity are still prevalent.

For over 300 years Jaffna was once a Kingdom until the Portuguese invaded in 1620. Not long after the Dutch took over, and the city became an important port in the region. The British came in at the tail-end of the 18th century and stayed till Sri Lanka gained independence in 1948. It was during the British rule that more Tamils were brought over from India as they were considered more cooperative and hard-working than the Sinhalese. Before the war the population was still considerably mixed though, with Tamils, Moors and Sinhalese. During the fighting the Moors and Sinhalese were forced out and many Tamils also left, choosing to flee. In the span of 14 years the population nearly halved. Nevertheless, Jaffna remains Sri Lanka’s Hindu-Tamil cultural and religious centre and is now trying to rebuild a future after years of seeing progress being stifled by the war.

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This home belonged to this man’s parents and he grew up until the land became a High Security Zone and was occupied by the Sri Lankan Army in the eighties. 25,000 people were evacuated in total. 20 years later the house and surrounding land was handed back to him after he provided all the necessary documentation to prove his ownership. The house is in disrepair so he is forced to rent a place. He now uses the land to run a small timber mill.

Jaffna, downtown

A street cobbler waits for customers on the steps of Jaffna’s central market.

Beach road, Jaffna

Children play near a Church on Beach road, Jaffna.

Beach road, Jaffna

A young teen watches two fishermen bring a boat in, on Beach road, Jaffna.